14 August 2012 Karim Elatov

I was recently using the UCS Manager CLI and I wanted to share my findings. You can SSH to the UCSM (UCS Manager) and then run commands to figure out information about your hardware configuration. Whenever working with Cisco UCS Servers, the first thing we need to figure out is how Service Profiles are used in a UCS Environment. Cisco has an excellent article about this entitled “Cisco UCS Manager CLI Configuration Guide, Release 2.0”, I like their definition:

Service profiles are the central concept of Cisco UCS. Each service profile serves a specific purpose: ensuring that the associated server hardware has the configuration required to support the applications it will host.

The service profile maintains configuration information about the server hardware, interfaces, fabric connectivity, and server and network identity. This information is stored in a format that you can manage through Cisco UCS Manager. All service profiles are centrally managed and stored in a database on the fabric interconnect.

Every server must be associated with a service profile.

Service Profiles consist of Policies:

Policies determine how Cisco UCS components will act in specific circumstances. You can create multiple instances of most policies. For example, you might want different boot policies, so that some servers can PXE boot, some can SAN boot, and others can boot from local storage.

Policies allow separation of functions within the system. A subject matter expert can define policies that are used in a service profile, which is created by someone without that subject matter expertise. For example, a LAN administrator can create adapter policies and quality of service policies for the system. These policies can then be used in a service profile that is created by someone who has limited or no subject matter expertise with LAN administration.

You can create and use two types of policies in Cisco UCS Manager:

  • Configuration policies that configure the servers and other components
  • Operational policies that control certain management, monitoring, and access control functions

So first find out what is the name of the server that you are working with. You can either look at the UCSM Web Page or if you know the name of the server you can find out what chassis your blade is in. To see all the available servers you can do the following:

Cisco UCS 6100 Series Fabric Interconnect
Using keyboard-interactive authentication.
Password:
Cisco Nexus Operating System (NX-OS) Software
TAC support: http://www.cisco.com/tac
Copyright (c) 2002-2012, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
The copyrights to certain works contained in this software are
owned by other third parties and used and distributed under
license. Certain components of this software are licensed under
the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2.0 or the GNU
Lesser General Public License (LGPL) Version 2.1. A copy of each
such license is available at
http://www.opensource.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.php and

http://www.opensource.org/licenses/lgpl-2.1.php

p2-ucsm-A# show service-profile inventory
Service Profile Name Type Server Assignment Association
-------------------- ----------------- ------- ---------- -----------
p2-b200 Initial Template Unassigned Unassociated
p2-b200-1 Instance 1/1 Assigned Associated
p2-b200-2 Instance 1/2 Assigned Associated
p2-b250 Initial Template Unassigned Unassociated
p2-b250-3 Instance 1/3 Assigned Associated

Each Server has a Service Profile Attached to it. I will be working with p2-b200-1 Service Profile, which corresponds to Chassis 1, Server 2. So let’s check out the HBAs that are available for this server:

p2-ucsm-A# scope chassis 1
p2-ucsm-A /chassis # scope server 2
p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server # scope adapter 1
p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server/adapter # show host-fc-if

FC Interface:
Id Wwn Model Name Operability
---------- ----------------------- ---------- ---------- -----------
1 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0B:02 N20-AC0002 fc1 Operable
2 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:02 N20-AC0002 fc0 Operable

We can see we have two HBAs on the server and their corresponding WWPNs. We can also check out the available NICs:

p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server/adapter # show host-eth-if

Eth Interface:
ID Dynamic MAC Address Name Operability
---------- ------------------- ---------- -----------
1 00:25:B5:02:01:01 eth0 Operable
2 00:25:B5:02:02:01 eth1 Operable
3 00:25:B5:02:03:01 eth2 Operable
4 00:25:B5:02:04:01 eth3 Operable
7 00:25:B5:02:07:01 eth6 Operable
8 00:25:B5:02:08:01 eth7 Operable

You can see that there are different MACs and WWPNs assigned for this server. To see the distinguished name of you adapters you can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server # show server adapter vnics

Eth Interface:

Adapter Interface Vnic Dn Dynamic MAC Addr Type
------- --------- ---------- ---------------- ----
1 1 org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/ether-eth0 00:25:B5:02:01:02 Ether
1 2 org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/ether-eth1 00:25:B5:02:02:02 Ether
1 3 org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/ether-eth2 00:25:B5:02:03:02 Ether
1 4 org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/ether-eth3 00:25:B5:02:04:02 Ether
1 7 org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/ether-eth6 00:25:B5:02:07:02 Ether
1 8 org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/ether-eth7 00:25:B5:02:08:02 Ether

FC Interface:

Adapter Interface Vnic Dn Dynamic WWPN Type
------- --------- ---------- ------------ ----
1 1 org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/fc-fc1 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0B:01 Fc
1 2 org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/fc-fc0 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:01 Fc

The WWPNs and the MACs are assigned to the devices, this is actually defined in the pools. From the config guide:

Pools are collections of identities, or physical or logical resources, that are available in the system. All pools increase the flexibility of service profiles and allow you to centrally manage your system resources.

You can use pools to segment unconfigured servers or available ranges of server identity information into groupings that make sense for the data center. For example, if you create a pool of unconfigured servers with similar characteristics and include that pool in a service profile, you can use a policy to associate that service profile with an available, unconfigured server.

If you pool identifying information, such as MAC addresses, you can pre-assign ranges for servers that will host specific applications. For example, all database servers could be configured within the same range of MAC addresses, UUIDs, and WWNs.

To see what pool your vHBA belongs to, you can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A# scope service-profile server 1/2
p2-ucsm-A /org/service-profile # show vhba detail

vHBA:
Name: fc0
Fabric ID: A
Dynamic WWPN: 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:02
Desired Order: Unspecified
Actual Order: 8
Desired VCon Placement: Any
Actual VCon Placement: 1
Equipment: sys/chassis-1/blade-2/adaptor-1/host-fc-2
Template Name: vHBA-A
Oper Nw Templ Name: org-root/san-conn-templ-vHBA-A
Persistent Binding: Disabled
Max Data Field Size: 2048
Adapter Policy: VMWare
Oper Adapter Policy: org-root/fc-profile-VMWare
WWPN Pool: WWPN_Pod2_A
Oper Ident Pool Name: org-root/wwn-pool-WWPN_Pod2_A
Pin Group:
QoS Policy:
Oper QoS Policy:
Stats Policy: default
Oper Stats Policy: org-root/thr-policy-default
Current Task:

Name: fc1
Fabric ID: B
Dynamic WWPN: 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0B:02
Desired Order: Unspecified
Actual Order: 7
Desired VCon Placement: Any
Actual VCon Placement: 1
Equipment: sys/chassis-1/blade-2/adaptor-1/host-fc-1
Template Name: vHBA-B
Oper Nw Templ Name: org-root/san-conn-templ-vHBA-B
Persistent Binding: Disabled
Max Data Field Size: 2048
Adapter Policy: VMWare
Oper Adapter Policy: org-root/fc-profile-VMWare
WWPN Pool: WWPN_Pod2_B
Oper Ident Pool Name: org-root/wwn-pool-WWPN_Pod2_B
Pin Group:
QoS Policy:
Oper QoS Policy:
Stats Policy: default
Oper Stats Policy: org-root/thr-policy-default
Current Task:

You can see that vHBA1 (fc0) is from WWPN_Pod2_A and vHBA2 (fc1) is from WWPN_Pod2_B. To see a list of defined pools you can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A# scope org
p2-ucsm-A /org # show wwn-pool

WWN Pool:
Name Purpose Size Assigned
-------------------- ------------------- ---------- --------
default Port Wwn Assignment 0 0
node-default Node Wwn Assignment 0 0
USL_Pod2 Node Wwn Assignment 3 3
WWPN_Pod2_A Port Wwn Assignment 3 3
WWPN_Pod2_B Port Wwn Assignment 3 3

We are using the bottom two. Just to see the pattern of the pool let’s check out one of them:

p2-ucsm-A# scope org
p2-ucsm-A /org # scope wwn-pool WWPN_Pod2_A
p2-ucsm-A /org/wwn-pool # show expand

WWN Pool:
Name: WWPN_Pod2_A
Purpose: Port Wwn Assignment
Size: 3
Assigned: 3

WWN Initiator Block:
From To
----------------------- --
20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:00 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:02

WWN Initiator:
Id: 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:00
Name:
Assigned: Yes
Assigned To Dn: org-root/ls-p2-b250-3/fc-fc0

Id: 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:01
Name:
Assigned: Yes
Assigned To Dn: org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/fc-fc0

Id: 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:02
Name:
Assigned: Yes
Assigned To Dn: org-root/ls-p2-b200-2/fc-fc0

So our range is defined as follows; 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:00 to  20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:02. To get a list of all the WWPNs assigned from this pool in a concise manner you can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A /org/wwn-pool # show initiator

WWN Initiator:
Id Name Assigned Assigned To Dn
----------------------- ---------- -------- --------------
20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:00 Yes org-root/ls-p2-b250-3/fc-fc0
20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:01 Yes org-root/ls-p2-b200-1/fc-fc0
20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:02 Yes org-root/ls-p2-b200-2/fc-fc0

You can check similar setting for the mac pools as well. If you have two IO Modules in the enclosure/chassis then you define two fabrics; a and b. We had two modules:

p2-ucsm-A# scope chassis 1
p2-ucsm-A /chassis # show iom

IOM:
ID Side Fabric ID Overall Status
---------- ----- --------- --------------
1 Left A Operable
2 Right B Operable

You can also check if the server is connected to both IOMs:

p2-ucsm-A# scope server 1/2
p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server # show status detail
Server 1/2:
Name:
User Label:
Slot Status: Equipped
Conn Path: A,B
Conn Status: A,B
Managing Instance: A
Availability: Unavailable
Admin State: In Service
Overall Status: Ok
Oper Qualifier: N/A
Discovery: Complete
Current Task:

We can see our connection path is to A and B, both of our fabrics. For each Fabric we usually have a fabric-interconnect:

p2-ucsm-A# show fabric-interconnect

Fabric Interconnect:
ID OOB IP Addr OOB Gateway OOB Netmask Operability
---- --------------- --------------- --------------- -----------
A 10.102.100.13 10.102.100.1 255.255.255.0 Operable
B 10.102.100.15 10.102.100.1 255.255.255.0 Operable

Usually you setup “pinning” to pin you HBAs and NICs to a certain IO module, for load balancing. From the Config Guide:

Pinning in Cisco UCS is only relevant to uplink ports. You can pin Ethernet or FCoE traffic from a given server to a specific uplink Ethernet port or uplink FC port.

When you pin the NIC and HBA of both physical and virtual servers to uplink ports, you give the fabric interconnect greater control over the unified fabric. This control ensures more optimal utilization of uplink port bandwidth.

Cisco UCS uses pin groups to manage which NICs, vNICs, HBAs, and vHBAs are pinned to an uplink port. To configure pinning for a server, you can either assign a pin group directly, or include a pin group in a vNIC policy, and then add that vNIC policy to the service profile assigned to that server. All traffic from the vNIC or vHBA on the server travels through the I/O module to the same uplink port.

To check which HBA goes to which fabric we can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A# scope service-profile server 1/2
p2-ucsm-A /org/service-profile # show vhba

vHBA:
Name Fabric ID Dynamic WWPN
---------- --------- ------------
fc0 A 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:02
fc1 B 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0B:02

Each Fabric usually has a vSAN defined for it. To see the definition of each fabric we can check out the settings for each vHBA:

p2-ucsm-A# scope service-profile server 1/2
p2-ucsm-A /org/service-profile # scope vhba fc0
p2-ucsm-A /org/service-profile/vhba # show fc-if

Fibre Channel Interface:
Name: P2-VSAN-A
vSAN ID: 205
Operational VSAN: fabric/san/A/net-P2-VSAN-A

To check the NIC pinning we can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A# scope service-profile server 1/2
p2-ucsm-A /org/service-profile # show vnic

vNIC:
Name Fabric ID Dynamic MAC Addr
---------- --------- ----------------
eth0 A 00:25:B5:02:01:01
eth1 A 00:25:B5:02:02:01
eth2 A 00:25:B5:02:03:01
eth3 A 00:25:B5:02:04:01
eth6 A 00:25:B5:02:07:01
eth7 A 00:25:B5:02:08:01

For each of the interfaces you can define a set of allowed VLANs, to see what they are you can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A /org/service-profile # scope vnic eth0
p2-ucsm-A /org/service-profile/vnic # show eth-if

Ethernet Interface:
Name: Management
Dynamic MAC Addr: 00:25:B5:02:01:01
Default Network: No
VLAN ID: 200
Operational VLAN: fabric/lan/net-Management

Name: ServiceConsole
Dynamic MAC Addr: 00:25:B5:02:01:01
Default Network: Yes
VLAN ID: 201
Operational VLAN: fabric/lan/net-ServiceConsole

Name: Storage1
Dynamic MAC Addr: 00:25:B5:02:01:01
Default Network: No
VLAN ID: 203
Operational VLAN: fabric/lan/net-Storage1

Name: storage2
Dynamic MAC Addr: 00:25:B5:02:01:01
Default Network: No
VLAN ID: 204
Operational VLAN: fabric/lan/net-storage2

Name: vlan260
Dynamic MAC Addr: 00:25:B5:02:01:01
Default Network: No
VLAN ID: 260
Operational VLAN: fabric/lan/net-vlan260

Name: vmotion
Dynamic MAC Addr: 00:25:B5:02:01:01
Default Network: No
VLAN ID: 202
Operational VLAN: fabric/lan/net-vmotion

That is a list of allowed VLANs for that Nic.

To see how the physical ports correspond to the virtual ports on the Fabric Interconnect we can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A# scope service-profile server 1/2
p2-ucsm-A /org/service-profile # show circuit
Service Profile: p2-b200-2
Server: 1/2
Fabric ID: A
VIF vNIC Link State Overall Status Prot State Prot Role Admin Pin Oper Pin Transport
---- ------ ----------- -------------- ------------- ----------- ---------- ---------- ---------
43 Error Error 0/0 0/0 Unknown
711 eth0 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 0/11 Ether
712 eth1 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 0/11 Ether
713 eth2 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 0/11 Ether
714 eth3 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 0/11 Ether
717 eth6 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 0/11 Ether
718 eth7 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 0/11 Ether
720 fc0 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 2/1 Fc
8912 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 0/0 Ether
Fabric ID: B
VIF vNIC Link State Overall Status Prot State Prot Role Admin Pin Oper Pin Transport
---- ------ ----------- -------------- ------------- ----------- ---------- ---------- ---------
44 Error Error 0/0 0/0 Unknown
719 fc1 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 0/0 Fc
8911 Up Active No Protection Unprotected 0/0 0/0 Ether

So let’s connect to FI (Fabric Interconnect) A and see if we can confirm the virtual port of fc0 (remember the WWPN of that vHBA is the following 20:00:00:25:B5:02:0A:02). There are two ways to go about it. First we can find the interface our self and make sure it corresponds with 720:

p2-ucsm-A# connect nxos a
Cisco Nexus Operating System (NX-OS) Software
TAC support: http://www.cisco.com/tac
Copyright (c) 2002-2012, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
The copyrights to certain works contained in this software are
owned by other third parties and used and distributed under
license. Certain components of this software are licensed under
the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2.0 or the GNU
Lesser General Public License (LGPL) Version 2.1. A copy of each
such license is available at
http://www.opensource.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.php and

http://www.opensource.org/licenses/lgpl-2.1.php

p2-ucsm-A(nxos)# show npv flogi-table | inc 20:00:00:25:b5:02:0a:02
vfc720 205 0xd40005 20:00:00:25:b5:02:0a:02 20:00:00:25:b5:02:00:02 fc2/1

That actually looks good, we see that it corresponds to vfc720 and it’s on vSAN 205. We can go further and make sure the config matches our server and the interface is up:

p2-ucsm-A(nxos)# show run int vfc720

!Command: show running-config interface vfc720
!Time: Tue Aug 14 03:54:59 2012

version 5.0(3)N2(2.1w)

interface vfc720
bind interface Vethernet8912
switchport trunk allowed vsan 205
switchport description server 1/2, VHBA fc0
no shutdown

p2-ucsm-A(nxos)# show int vfc720
vfc720 is trunking
Bound interface is Vethernet8912
Port description is server 1/2, VHBA fc0
Hardware is Virtual Fibre Channel
Port WWN is 22:cf:00:05:73:f3:17:ff
Admin port mode is F, trunk mode is on
snmp link state traps are enabled
Port mode is TF
Port vsan is 205
Trunk vsans (admin allowed and active) (205)
Trunk vsans (up) (205)
Trunk vsans (isolated) ()
Trunk vsans (initializing) ()
1 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 bytes/sec, 0 frames/sec
1 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 bytes/sec, 0 frames/sec
7905603 frames input, 14934600272 bytes
2 discards, 0 errors
8466443 frames output, 15137370704 bytes
0 discards, 0 errors
last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Interface last changed at Fri Aug 10 19:25:38 2012

That all looks good and we can see that it’s actually bound to Vethernet8912, so let’s check out that interface to make sure it’s good:

p2-ucsm-A(nxos)# show run int Vethernet8912

!Command: show running-config interface Vethernet8912
!Time: Tue Aug 14 03:56:21 2012

version 5.0(3)N2(2.1w)

interface Vethernet8912
description server 1/2, VHBA fc0
pinning server
no cdp enable
switchport access vlan 2051
bind interface Ethernet1/1/2 channel 720
service-policy type queuing input default-in-policy
no shutdown

p2-ucsm-A(nxos)# show int Vethernet8912
Vethernet8912 is up
Bound Interface is Ethernet1/1/2
Hardware: Virtual, address: 0005.73f3.17c0 (bia 0005.73f3.17c0)
Description: server 1/2, VHBA fc0
Encapsulation ARPA
Port mode is access
EtherType is 0x8100
Rx
7905601 unicast packets 2 multicast packets 0 broadcast packets
7905603 input packets 14934600272 bytes
0 input packet drops
Tx
8466443 unicast packets 0 multicast packets 0 broadcast packets
8466443 output packets 15137370704 bytes
0 flood packets
0 output packet drops

We can see that the description matches our port “server 1/2, VHBA fc0” which is what we were trying to track down.

We can do a similar thing for eth0 (vNic1) as well.

p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server/adapter # connect nxos a
Cisco Nexus Operating System (NX-OS) Software
TAC support: http://www.cisco.com/tac
Copyright (c) 2002-2012, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
The copyrights to certain works contained in this software are
owned by other third parties and used and distributed under
license. Certain components of this software are licensed under
the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2.0 or the GNU
Lesser General Public License (LGPL) Version 2.1. A copy of each
such license is available at
http://www.opensource.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.php and

http://www.opensource.org/licenses/lgpl-2.1.php

p2-ucsm-A(nxos)# show mac address-table | inc 0025.b502.0101
* 201 0025.b502.0101 static 0 F F Veth711
p2-ucsm-A(nxos)# show run int Veth711

!Command: show running-config interface Vethernet711
!Time: Tue Aug 14 04:25:42 2012

version 5.0(3)N2(2.1w)

interface Vethernet711
description server 1/2, VNIC eth0
switchport mode trunk
no pinning server sticky
pinning server pinning-failure link-down
switchport trunk native vlan 201
switchport trunk allowed vlan 200-204,260
bind interface Ethernet1/1/2 channel 711
service-policy type queuing input default-in-policy
no shutdown

p2-ucsm-A(nxos)# show int Veth711
Vethernet711 is up
Bound Interface is Ethernet1/1/2
Hardware: Virtual, address: 0005.73f3.17c0 (bia 0005.73f3.17c0)
Description: server 1/2, VNIC eth0
Encapsulation ARPA
Port mode is trunk
EtherType is 0x8100
Rx
2344115 unicast packets 6 multicast packets 177584 broadcast packets
2521705 input packets 238901890 bytes
0 input packet drops
Tx
1758473 unicast packets 4688714 multicast packets 243995 broadcast packets
6691182 output packets 580388547 bytes
0 flood packets
0 output packet drops

The description fits and the appropriate VLANs are allowed.

We can also check out the local disk policy:

p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server # scope raid-controller 1 sas
p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server/raid-controller # show local-disk

Local Disk:
ID: 1
Block Size: 512
Blocks: 143638992
Size (MB): 70136
Operability: N/A
Presence: Equipped

ID: 2
Block Size: 512
Blocks: 143638992
Size (MB): 70136
Operability: N/A
Presence: Equipped

You can also check the boot order defined for the host:

p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server # show boot-order

Boot Definition:
Full Name: sys/chassis-1/blade-2/boot-policy
Reboot on Update: Yes

Boot LAN:
Order: 3

LAN Image Path:
Type: Primary
VNIC: eth0

Boot Storage:
Order: 2

SAN Image:
Type: Primary
VHBA: fc0

SAN Image Path:
Type: Primary

Type: Secondary

Type: Secondary
VHBA: fc1

SAN Image Path:
Type: Primary

Type: Secondary

Boot virtual media:
Order: 1
Access: Read Only

We can see that the boot order is the following:

  1. CD-ROM
  2. Boot From SAN, first fc0 then fc1
  3. PXE Boot from eth0

If you want to see what WWPNs are used for the boot from SAN you can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A /chassis/server # show boot-order detail

Boot Definition:
Full Name: sys/chassis-1/blade-2/boot-policy
Reboot on Update: Yes
Description:
Enforce Vnic Name: No

Boot LAN:
Order: 3

LAN Image Path:
Type: Primary
VNIC: eth0

Boot Storage:
Order: 2

SAN Image:
Type: Primary
VHBA: fc0

SAN Image Path:
Type: Primary
LUN: 0
WWN: 50:0A:09:83:8D:1F:72:B5

Type: Secondary
LUN: 0
WWN: 50:0A:09:84:8D:1F:72:B5

Type: Secondary
VHBA: fc1

SAN Image Path:
Type: Primary
LUN: 0
WWN: 50:0A:09:83:8D:1F:72:B5

Type: Secondary
LUN: 0
WWN: 50:0A:09:84:8D:1F:72:B5

Boot virtual media:
Order: 1
Access: Read Only

Now we can see that we will connect to first “50:0A:09:83:8D:1F:72:B5” using fc0 and then to “50:0A:09:84:8D:1F:72:B5”. If that doesn’t work we will use fc1 to either connect to “50:0A:09:83:8D:1F:72:B5” or “50:0A:09:84:8D:1F:72:B5”. To see the available boot-order policies you can run the following:

p2-ucsm-A# scope org
p2-ucsm-A /org # show boot-policy

Boot Policy:
Name Purpose Reboot on Update
-------------------- ----------- ----------------
default Operational No
diag Utility No
Local_Only Operational Yes
NetBoot Operational No
P2-SAN-Boot Operational Yes
SAN_NET_Boot Operational Yes
utility Utility No

Then you can drill further down to see what the policy is made up of:

p2-ucsm-A /org # scope boot-policy Local_Only
p2-ucsm-A /org/boot-policy # show expand

Boot Policy:
Name: Local_Only
Purpose: Operational
Reboot on Update: Yes

Boot Storage:
Order: 1

Local Storage:
Name: local-storage

If I find any more interesting commands, I will definitely update this post.

More stuff I found, here is how you can check what LUNs an HBA is connecting to:

First list the available adapters on a blade:

p1-ucsm-A# show server adapter 9/1
Server 9/1:
Adapter PID Vendor Serial Overall Status
------- ---------- ----------------- ------------ --------------
1 N20-AC0002 Cisco Systems Inc QCI1515ACEY Operable

Then Connect to the adapter and confirm the model and do the rest

p1-ucsm-A# connect adapter 9/1/1
adapter 9/1/1 # connect
adapter 9/1/1 # show-identity
description: "Cisco UCS VIC M81KR Adapter"
hw_version: "A2"
sw_version: "2.0(1w)"
adapter 9/1/1 (top):1# attach-fls
adapter 9/1/1 (fls):1# vnic
---- ---- ---- ------- -------
vnic ecpu type state lif
---- ---- ---- ------- -------
13 1 fc active 10
14 2 fc active 11
adapter 9/1/1 (fls):2# lunlist 13
vnic : 13 lifid: 10
- FLOGI State : init (fc_id 0x000000)
- PLOGI Sessions
- WWNN 50:0a:09:81:8d:df:db:4c WWPN 50:0a:09:81:8d:df:db:4c fc_id 0x000000
- LUN's configured (SCSI Type, Version, Vendor, Serial No.)
LUN ID : 0x0000000000000000 access failure
- REPORT LUNs Query Response
LUN ID : 0x0000000000000000
- Nameserver Query Response
- WWPN : 50:0a:09:81:8d:df:db:4c
- WWPN : 50:0a:09:82:9f:3f:52:ad
- WWPN : 50:0a:09:82:8f:3f:52:ad

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